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5 Tips for Setting Up Your First School Counseling Office

Someone on Instagram recently asked me for any advice I had on setting up her very first school counseling office. This has all been super fresh in my mind as I packed up my office and prepare to move into a new building. Offices can run the gamut, from old custodial closets to classrooms with wall to wall windows. I tried to keep that in mind and provide tips that can apply to any type of situation you find yourself in!

school counseling office

1. Meet sensory needs.

The most used item in my school counseling office is surprisingly my sequin mermaid pillow! Really comforting to hold and fidget with. I think having a variety of fidgets available and visible makes a big difference. My pillow is from Amazon but I’ve seen them cheaper at 5 Below and WalMart. The majority of my fidgets have come from the Target Dollar Spot. I’ve also got seat discs available to students in small groups. You have to look out for your own sensory needs, too. For example, I sit on a yoga ball instead of a desk chair. It keeps me more engaged both physically and mentally.

2. You don’t have to have a desk!

I downgraded to a small table two years. Last year, I skipped it all together next year and just used my small groups table when I’m on my laptop or doing paperwork. This keeps me organized because I don’t have places for stuff to pile up. I also think it makes me much more approachable when I’m in my office without a big crazy desk between me and whoever walks in. You actually don’t really have to have anything. Lots of counselors swear by lamps instead of overhead lights – this makes me sleepy and I love overhead lighting (though I do put filters on them). Lots of counselors love their white noise and Pandora – I personally avoid them after a trauma training I went to said they can easily dysregulate people still experiencing trauma symptoms.

3. Functional decor is the best.

My first couple years I accepted all the hand me downs and bought all the cheap Target back to school character posters. I didn’t love any of it but I felt like I had to have something up everywhere. Then and I learned that less is more. And that’s a good thing because unless you have a classroom, wall space is limited. Too much stuff on the walls is overwhelming (which is the last thing a dysregulated kiddo or teacher needs). I try to make sure the stuff on my walls is either awesome and makes me super happy or it serves a purpose. Feelings posters rock! I made my own with clipart but used to have the “hand drawn kids” ones you can find on Amazon (affiliate link). I had one of “what’s behind your anger” posters too. Keep scrolling to the bottom of the post for a smaller FREE version of the weather scale I had on my wall and used every day.

4. Comfort is key. Get the good chairs.

My circle chairs and bean bag chairs were a little splurge because they were bought from my own money but totally worth it. Sometimes teachers like to come sit in the circle chairs as well, and I’ve been known to use some of the comfy seating myself to decompress before I leave. Comfort to me also means that my space shouldn’t be sensory overload, so I try not to put too much on my walls or have too many colors.

5. Focus on organization in your school counseling office.

I am way more effective and get way more done when I’m organized. If you don’t see it and/or if it’s not easily accessible, you won’t use it. This goes for games, toys, books, and important paperwork you’re supposed to complete. Consider prioritizing your organization over your aesthetics. Create systems for all the different kinds of “papers” you’ll have: copy paper, referrals, lesson plans, RTII stuff, behavior plan copies, the list goes on. Where will you store papers for ongoing individual students (workbooks, drawings, etc.)? Will you have a place to put “outgoing” papers (meeting note reminders for parents, copies of meeting notes for teachers, etc.)? Where do materials for classroom lessons go when you’re done with them? Make a plan! Chances are the plan is going to change, but you’ll still have a more successful year if you make sure your space is set up for efficiency. I have a post about school counseling office organization if you want to learn more. I am less than a month away from setting up my third school counseling office and all of this is so good to have fresh in my mind!

6 Responses

  1. I like your tip about having comfortable chairs for your students. That makes sense considering people are more willing to open up when they feel comfortable. My son has depression and should probably see a counselor to get through high school.

  2. School counselors know how to listen and help. They’ll take your problem seriously and work with you to find a good solution. School counselors are trained to help with everything and it doesn’t have to be just school stuff. A counselor can help you deal with the sadness when someone has died as well as advise you on taking the right classes to get into your dream college.

    1. Hi! I did two – that was all had room for or needed most of the time. I occasionally pulled up a third regular chair if I was doing a student-parent-counselor or student-teacher-counselor meeting.

        1. Hi Ellie,
          I linked two different types of chairs through Amazon in the post, I have two of the soft Disk chairs and then two of the poof like bean bag chairs that the kiddos love to sit in. The two specific styles of chairs I have aren’t currently available so I would check out Amazon and Target especially at back to school time!

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Hello, I’m Sara!

With 10 years of experience in
elementary school counseling,
I get to serve in a different way now
– by helping fellow counselors and
educators!

I value quality over quantity,
effective practices and resources,
and meeting the unique needs of all
our diverse learners.